karla caves

Karla dating back to 160 B.C., is among the most important caves in India. for a leisurely visitors to Lonavala, Karla is a must. it has been included, in its itinerary by the sightseeing tours of the Maharashtra tourism development corporation. MTDC’c holiday camp is also situated in Karla vicinity. Proceeding along the highway in Pune direction and passing by Valvan dam, one comes across a road junction 7 km. from Lonavala with a cluster of roadside restaurants. The road to Karla dating back to 160 B.C., is among the most important caves in India. For leisurely visitors to Lonavala, Karla is a must. It has been included, in its itinerary by the sightseeing tours of the Maharashtra tourism development corporation. MTDC’c holiday camp is also situated in Karla vicinity. Proceeding along the highway in Pune direction and passing by Valvan dam, one comes across a road junction 7 km. from Lonavala with a cluster of roadside restaurants.

The road to the left goes to Karla caves, 3 km away and the road to the right goes to Malavali station and further to Bhaja caves. The ST operates bus between Lonavala st stand & Karla caves. A distance of about 10 km touching the MTDC holiday camp on way. The archaeological departments charge a nominal fee for a visit to the caves. The 175-meter climb from the foot of the hill to the caves is stiff. For the convenience of the tourists, the govt. has made a new road from the bass of Karla Caves. One can reach there by their two or four Wheeler. A striking contrast between Karla situated on the far east end of Lonavala environment & Khandala at the western outskirts is the climate. During summer, it is quite hot as one goes up the hill in the afternoon. at the entrance of the principal cave is the temple of Goddess Ekvira visited by thousands of devotees from the coastal region around Mumbai during the annual fair falling in April(Chaitra) and also during Navratri. Ekvira temple is on the right side of the main cave while on the left side is a lofty column with three lions on its top. The principal cave is the largest chaitya among Buddhist cave in the country, being 15 meters wide & 16 meters high. The most remarkable feature of the cave is its arched roof supported by wooden beams which have astonishingly survived the onslaught of elements for more than 2000 years. There is absolutely no sign of any corrosion. It is the finest example of the kind perhaps in the world. About a meter away from the walls of the chaitya hall is a row of columns, 15 on either side. At the head of the columns is exquisite carvings showing lovers seated on elephants. At the far end of chaitya is the ‘Dagoba’, a huge circular mound. A distinguishing feature of the Dagoba here is its wooden umbrella which too has been left untouched by white ants for more than 20 centuries. Yet another distinguishing feature of the Karla caves is the ‘Donor Couples’ carved into the stone walls near the entrance. They are splendid pieces of sculpture.

Flanking the main chaitya are several Viharas dwellings of priests carved into the rock. There are quite a few cisterns adjoining the viharas which must have provided drinking water to the priests. some viharas are quite high and can be approached by narrow stairs cut up into the rock. he left goes to Karla caves, 3km away and the road to the right goes to Malavali station and further to Bhaja caves. the ST operates buses between Lonavala st stand & Karla caves. a distance of about 10 km touching the MTDC holiday camp on way. the archaeological departments charge a nominal fee for a visit to the caves.

The 175-meter climb from the foot of the hill to the caves is stiff. for the convenience of the tourists, the govt. has made a new road from the bass of Karla Caves. one can reach there by their own two or four wheelers. a striking contrast between Karla situated on the far east end of Lonavala environment & Khandala at the western outskirts is the climate. during summer it is quite hot as one goes up the hill in the afternoon.

at the entrance of the principal cave is the temple of Goddess Ekvira visited by thousands of devotees from the coastal region around Mumbai during the annual fair falling in April(Chaitra) and also during Navratri. Ekvira temple is on the right side of the main cave while at the left side is a lofty column with three lions on its top. the principal cave is the largest chaitya among Buddhist cave in the country, being 15 meters wide & 16 meters high. the most remarkable feature of the cave is its arched roof supported by wooden beams which have astonishingly survived the onslaught of elements for more than 2000 years. there is absolutely no sign of any corrosion. it is the finest example of the kind perhaps in the world.

about a meter away from the walls of the chaitya hall is a row of columns, 15 on either side. at the head of the column are exquisite carvings showing lovers seated on elephants. at the far end of chaitya is the ‘Dagoba’, a huge circular mound. a distinguishing feature of the Dagoba here is its wooden umbrella which too has been left untouched by white ants for more than 20 centuries. yet another distinguishing feature of the Karla caves is the ‘Donor Couples’ carved into the stone walls near the entrance. they are splendid pieces of sculpture. Flanking the main chaitya are several Viharas dwellings of priests carved into the rock. there are quite a few cisterns adjoining the viharas which must have provided drinking water to the priests. some of the viharas are quite high and can be approached by narrow stairs cut up into the rock.

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